Posted in Prose

How to Train Your Ron

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I saw this post a few days earlier and it made me realise that, yes I indeed assume that everyone has read Harry Potter. I have grown up reading Harry Potter, started reading when I was 6 actually, and I simply cannot picture not having read it. It is mind boggling. I am known for forcing it to my close friends and a couple months ago I gave one of my copies of the Philosopher’s Stone to my dear Ron, so that he can stay a Ron and not become a Cormac. He is a muggleborn (has only watched the movies and not read the books) and I constantly casually include Harry Potter in our daily conversation, so he is not totally clueless when it comes to the franchise. Still, it was pretty entertaining to witness his reactions.

The first thing I want to emphasise is that he has liked the book more than the movie-which is honestly not very surprising. Although the first movie is a loyal adaptation, almost to a fault, the audience cannot immerse in the story. For him, it was mainly because of the acting of the child stars. They are not terrible, but also not very convincing so the designated emotions do not reach us.

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You probably remember the “I’m a what” part quite clearly.

So reading the book enabled him to feel more. That is also natural, Rowling gives intricate details when it comes to her characters-and we find these details in other books as well. Hence the books feel more well put and consistent that way; like how we learn about the instance where James saves Snape’s life. At the end of the book when Dumbledore answers Harry’s questions, he casually gives a reason for Snape’s hatred for Harry’s father. My Ron thought that Dumbledore might be lying to Harry to give him a nice, Gryffindor-worth answer regarding his father to soothe him. And he is not wrong in his guess, Dumbledore is known for being a master manipulator. He also thought that Dumbledore might have let Harry face Quirrell and yet again he is not wrong. Dumbledore always let Harry test his strengths and weaknesses, to prepare him for his final task that he needs to face alone. He kind of confirms this to Harry as well in later books. Although Harry thinks that he does stuff due to his luck and external forces/help, he is good when it comes to practice simply because his instincts are good and he is able to develop them (and yes trouble always finds him). Thanks to his adventures he is quite adaptable and hence good at improvisation.

Harry’s adaptability is another thing my Ron focused on. He found it sort of weird of Harry to just accept the wizarding world without any problems. The thing here is that Harry had an awful childhood where he simply didn’t belong; nobody wanted to talk to him not to anger Dudley and he had ill fitting clothes and ill fitting rumours about him. So just like Hermione does, yet another outsider in his “normal” world, he accepts the wizarding world as his true reality; as belonging to it and refer time and time again to Hogwarts as his only home. Not only he is a wizard, pretty cool thing to learn when you are eleven, but he is also rich, famous and good at sports. And for once in his life he has a true friend. What is saddening about Harry is that in the Chamber of Secrets he visits the Burrow and surprised to find that the Weasleys like him. He is so not used to affection and love that he finds himself not worthy of genuine attention and affection.

Although Harry takes to the wizarding world quite easily, he does not let his muggle life go that easily. My Ron paid attention to the way Harry always seems to compare anything at Hogwarts with what he had at Dursleys. When he is at his first feats at Hogwarts, he thinks about the food back at Privet Drive and constantly think what would the Dursleys’ reaction be had they seen Harry’s money/friends/school. He lets go of this habit once he is comfortable in the wizarding world, but maintains it throughout the first book.

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Because he didn’t get to indulge in anything sweet at Privet Drice, he goes and buys everything. Oh, Harry…

He commented on the whole Snape-seemed-to-be-the-bad-guy-but-turned-out-okay. Rowling carefully chose the instances where Harry sees Quirrell outside the classroom and Snape is always there, somehow threatening him. It is quite a success (in his words) of Rowling to raise no doubts in the reader about Snape’s bad intents, hence it makes quite a good surprising element when we find out that it is Quirrel all along. He thought Snape a well developed character, but not a good person (honey he is just starting!) and thought that Rowling was a little bit easy on Snape, tried to make him seem like a hero. I wholeheartedly agree with him on that one. Rowling herself said that she saw Snape neither as a hero, nor as a villain. And by giving him a sad backstory (I am talking about the abusive muggle father bit, not Hogwarts) she sort of made up for his shortcomings, I.e. his power-abusive attitude towards his students: he picks on Harry the moment he sees him (“You see what you expect to see Severus”—Dumbledore), constantly ignores Hermione (don’t want to say because she is a Muggleborn, but yeah) and he is Neville’s biggest fear. She sort of gives Snape lovers (many of whom are movie watchers only, at least from what I have observed) something to work with to justify him. I have even met someone who said that Snape was faking it in front of others (and he didn’t mean to call Lily the m-word) so that the Death Eaters’d believe him. So, I am glad that we agree on Snape: an interesting character but a horrible person. And he asked the very question that I have been asking myself: why did Harry name his kid after him? Had Snape known, he would have turned in his grave.

In general, he seemed to have genuinely liked the book and will continue reading. He has carried the book with him, so that he could read once he got the chance. He found the plot detailed and well developed despite it being considered a children’s book. I am so glad he thinks that way, because as you know, after the Prisoner of Azkaban the plot line gets more complicated and the language more complex. He is speculating on things, although how can you speculate without any influence after seeing the movies at least? I am proud and glad though; he seems to agree with my opinions on almost everything (Snape being the first) and now he knows why I call him my Ron. I am pleased that he accepted I was right, I trained him well. 🙂 (No offence to Rons out there, but his life is easier when he listens to Hermione.)

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